Urban Mind – The Conscious Cities Festival 2018 + -

The Conscious Cities Festival gathers those interested in the creation of human-centred environments. Research and practice using the conscious cities approach explores how architecture and urban design can better consider and respond to human needs through science informed design, data analysis and new technology.

This year’s festival looks at the key factors in creating a better built environment. The events over 5 days will focus on Architecture, Urban Design, City Tech, Behavioural Science, and Property.

Tue, October 23, 2018

10:00 am – 9:00 pm

Professor Andrea Mechelli

Professor of Early Intervention in Mental Health at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London. Clinical Psychologist at the NHS.

Andrea‘s research involves the integration of machine learning techniques with neuroimaging data, with the aim of developing and validating novel tools for the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

Urban Mind: In the past few years he has pursued a new line of research involving the use of smartphone technologies to monitor the impact of the surrounding environment on mental wellbeing as people go about their daily life.

Talk: Urban Mind – using smartphone technologies to investigate the impact of the urban environment on mental wellbeing in real time.

Book here!

 

Alternative School of Economics – ‘Speaking to the City’ + -

The Alternative School of Economics is a collaboration between artists Ruth Beale and Amy Feneck. It is both an artwork and a way of working; it links artist practice with self-education as a way to study economics, creating a framework for investigating political, social and cultural issues.

The Alternative School of Economics are in residence at the Phytology site throughout the autumn and winter of 2018.

‘Speaking to the City’ responds to the position of the Phytology billboard, facing out towards the City of London. Taking on the radical East End tradition of resistance, the Alternative School of Economics present a series of statements that challenge the City and its logic of prosperity through financial growth. The statements morph and change over a period of three months, as each word becomes the next, a narrative of collective action is told. 

The Alternative School of Economics began in 2012, and was in part a response to the banking crisis of 2007/2008 in which economics dominated political and media discourse, when every subject from immigration to education was increasingly spoken about only in economic terms, and the inevitable outcome, we were told, was ‘austerity’.

“From this starting point, and our interest in self-education inspired by our residency at The Working Class Movement Library, we saw a demand upon the general public to redefine economics on their own terms, to study it through the lens of day-to-day reality and personal experience.

We continue to re-think what the study of economics is – to think of it not just as a scientific study of money and finance, but a subject that expands in to the study of many things – such as politics, geography, sociology, conflict and social relations. In this way, The Alternative School of Economics aims to respond to the changing pressures on the societies (local and global) in which we live and work.

The Alternative School of Economics sets out to learn together, collaboratively, and in a non-hierarchical way. It is a social practice, working with people, questioning ideas through conversations and relationships. It is also a process of education and our own self-education. Sometimes we make artworks like books, films and installations as part of the process.”

Conceptually The Alternative School of Economics is a statement – that people who are not economists, can set up an alternative school to reclaim economics as a social, everyday tool.

View the evolving billboard here.

Urban Mind Published In BioScience + -

In January 2018 Urban Mind will be featured in BioScience, a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the American Institute of Biological Sciences.

King’s College London, Landscape Architects J & L Gibbons and Nomad Projects have used smartphone-based technology to assess the relationship between exposure to nature and mental wellbeing.

We found that (i) being outdoors, seeing trees, hearing birdsong, seeing the sky, and feeling in contact with nature were associated with higher levels of mental wellbeing, and that (ii) the beneficial effects of nature were especially evident in those individuals with greater levels of impulsivity who are at greater risk of mental health issues.

The full article can be found here!

 

Urban Mind will launch a full-scale international study in March 2018. More details coming soon…